Tuesday, June 14, 2016

WDT: Gin Mill To Locate in Tony River Neighborhood

   The owners of the Tilted Kilt in Watertown have won a court fight to open a distillery and event center/restaurant on the St. Lawrence River near Clayton.
    Neighbors had sought to block the business venture on NIMBY grounds.
     Whether the world needs another vanity distillery is not known but they are popular sidelines for the wealthy and provide a backdrop for the restaurant.
       Watertown Daily Times | Saint Lawrence Spirits project gets ‘go ahead’ from Clayton after court decision

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Vanity distillery? Would that be like a vanity winery or a vanity restaurant ? Seems kind of strange to say that an enterprise based on individuals working to provide goods or services that are not cookie cutter, mass produced, franchised or corporate, are vanity.
Sounds more like the missive of a man who has failed, vs one who believe in the freedom and beauty of individual success.
Shame on you. If you try harder, and work smarter, you can perhaps win again.

Anonymous said...


If Clayton indicated that they did not want this, did Watertown make a pitch to have it here? In my opinion we do not exploit our proximity to the 1000 islands region to its full potential.

Our anti-business stance is legendary here in the city, and is preventing us from moving forward. Too many restrictions, boards, and hurdles to real development. What happened to Western Blvd and the jobs and development it would have created? This is part of the problem.

Anonymous said...

8:41, if you can't see the difference between a real business and a hobbyist green grocery type vanity business, then you have too much money but didn't earn it. You either inherited it, married it, or got a government contract you didn't deserve.

Anonymous said...

Hey 130 youre right, Uncle Sam and Uncle Otis quite a pair....

Anonymous said...

8:41 - sorry for your loss

Anonymous said...

1;30 - FYI - Craft beverage production is one of the, if not the fastest growing industries in the US. It is a field where individuals can compete against corporate giants on a regional scale. Locally it accounts for approximately 30% of the tourism draw to the 1000 Islands. But of course you probably already know that, because you seem to be a business "xpert bout stuff".

Drink up. Bud Lite's cheap and plentiful. Or be brave and spring for some Mich Ultra. Yummmmmmmmm.

Anonymous said...

Clayton wants it.
White whine and brie Summer residents don't want the commercialism on 12E---they think they own it. Let 'em go back to Naples, Florida where everybody goes to sleep at 7.

Big Winner: Job creators--the Garretts.
BIG losers---selfish Floridians. Look at their license plates. They don't even pay NYS taxes!Selfish, self serving. They must have a mascot---a raging bull?

Anonymous said...

Hey 6:23. These people pay thousands of dollars more than you do in property taxes. But i guess they should have no say in what is developed in their neighborhood??

Anonymous said...

6:23, yours is a very uninformed and limited opinion of the issue. There are many, many residents of Clayton who want to promote business, but retain the pleasant river community quality that has made Clayton the unique residential spot it is. Many of them, contrary to your ignorant assertion, are local year round residents who pay considerable taxes. Many of them are also part time residents with generations of residential history in the Clayton area, who more than qualify to have a voice in planning and zoning decisions.

Clayton has strived for years to strike a balance between development that is suitable to their goals,and that which is too commercial, and to date has avoided turning the town into a honky tonk like Alex Bay, which becomes a true ghost town in the off season, or a retail strip mall complex like outer Arsenal Street in Watertown.

If anyone should butt out of the issue, it's folks like you who have no context of what's involved.

Anonymous said...

One of the issues is zoning. Clayton defers to tbe wealthy who expend considersble sums before gaining approvl to do so and then the authorities bend over to allow the rezoning. So zoning is enforced based in who you are. Clsyton is heading doen a dangerous path.

Taxes are through the roof

Note one of the people who filed suit against thiz deal was the guy who sold the Garretts the property to bein with!

Anonymous said...

10:30 - SO what if Good old honky tonkin' A Bay turns into a ghost town in the Winter... so does Clayton! Which is why the more businesses that can run year-round, the better.
I'm curious what 'exactly' qualifies a business as suitable for "pleasant river community quality". Once one invokes a derisive term as 'honky tonk', it tends to show a bias against anything other than a quiet, retirement-community environment.
Goes to the old saying about 'better fences making better neighbors'.

Anonymous said...

12:19 - they guy who sold the Garretts the property: exactly! Someone who was quoted in the paper of record as stating that the type of business the Garretts want to do is exactly what someone should do with the place! Rather hypocritical to come back later to sue them.