Thursday, January 17, 2013

Cursive Only Used by Catholics These Days

    On this issue of cursive writing and its apparent demise in the texting world.
    I was chatting with a bookkeeper who was telling me he still uses a fountain pen.
    Of course he also went to parochial school  where the nuns enforced cursive writing in the second grade and a requirement to buy a fountain pen in the fourth grade.
    He also has an inkwell to fill his cartridges....Those nuns had a serious impact on this gent.
     Sister Rose was her name.  You'd don't get that kind of personal attention in public schools.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

This is yet another reason why private school kids do better in the world than their public school counterparts. The public schools have given up. They've gone the easy route and failed to fulfill their responsibilties. Not a new development. Perhaps if we paid them more. PUKE

Anonymous said...

Look at the Catholic School system today compared to fifty years ago. Only half of the Elementary Schools are left, there aren't any Nuns or Priests in the classroom, and if you look at the current tuition rates posted on the website it will cost $60,000.00 per child to educate K-12.
I feel it's kind of hard to justify that expense.

Anonymous said...

Private School kids used to have the benefit of an outstanding group of educators. Those educators were the Sisters. They were truly dedicated to their profession and their students. They didn't have to worry about a roof over their head, what to wear to work, what their spouse was doing, what their union bosses wanted them to do, or what their kids are doing. Their students were their kids and they were devoted to them. At St. Anthony's, the order that used to be there was called Religious Teachers Filippini. Imagine that, an entire order dedicated to teaching. That is what is missing in today's Catholic Schools, and in the world. We need more Nuns.

Anonymous said...

A bookkeeper with a fountain pen...
Not sure which is more rare, that or Nuns in the classroom.

Anonymous said...

Hardly anyone I know who sends their kids to private school, pays the sticker price. Even the filthy rich parents don't pay the full shot.

But it would be worth twice the price to make sure your kids don't go to school with the unwashed masses. Like that little bastard that recorded his evil deeds as he verbally sexually assaulted and verbally harassed the bus driver.

And although the kids are the larger problem, you don't want your kid influenced and brainwashed by the ridiculous public school system either.

Anonymous said...

The unwashed masses? We are still talking about our children, right? Think about the parents too, it used to be that if you got in trouble at school and the nun/teacher yelled/slapped you, one wouldn't dare go home and tell their parents as they would get smacked for having the teacher smack them. Today it is quite the other story. IMHO it all started during WWII when we had to take mothers out of the home to help win the war. They haven't gone back home - some because they don't want to, but most because two incomes are required today to make ends meet. Mom or Dad needs to be home for the kids. A parent needs to be there to make sure homework is done, lunches are made, and that there is a routine at home. If done correctly and with love and passion that job is more important than any paycheck and every family would benefit, every child would benefit, and our society as a whole would benefit.

Anonymous said...

Home schooling is the perfect answer - if you can actually do it. Oh, oh . . . . no snow days! Also no contagious deceases or bullying or notes to write to the teachers.

jim cummings said...

Don't kid yourself. I recall in parochial grade school, anyone that was left[evil] handed had that hand "immobilized" and taught to write with the [good] right hand. Cursing this torture under their breath.... Hence the name Cursive Writing

Anonymous said...

All the NUNS are ON THE BUS. After years of being exploited by the male leadership of the church, they found out they count as only 2/3 of a cleric.

Anonymous said...

I am another who continues to use a fountain pen. Ball point pens were simply not allowed at St Joseph's in the 50's.

I recently tried the micro uni-ball pens that have a similar feel but it's just not the same.

Currently have two grandchildren in Catholic school and, even without the Nuns, they are getting a superior education and a reaffirmation of the values imparted at home.

Anonymous said...

10:54 cry us a river.
I recall attending PUBLIC school and watching the teacher correct a few kids to who wrote with the wrong hand.

It wasn't just religious schools that didn't know... back then, no one knew that being left handed or gay was a birth defect instead of a character flaw.